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Optimize Your Pregnancy Diet with High Iron Foods to Boost Your Health and Baby’s Development

Pregnancy is an exciting and transformative time in a woman’s life. It is a period filled with anticipation and joy, but it is also a period of great responsibility. One of the key factors that contribute to a healthy pregnancy is nutrition. A diet rich in essential nutrients is crucial for both the health of the mother and the developing baby. Among these nutrients, iron plays a vital role.

Iron is a mineral that is essential for the production of hemoglobin, a protein in red blood cells that carries oxygen throughout the body. During pregnancy, the need for iron increases significantly to support the growing fetus and placenta. A high iron diet is therefore of paramount importance to ensure optimal health for both mother and baby.

Iron-rich foods such as lean meats, poultry, fish, and eggs are excellent sources of this essential mineral. Including these foods in the diet can help maintain adequate iron levels and prevent iron deficiency anemia, a condition that can have serious consequences for both the mother and the baby. Supplementation may also be necessary to meet the increased iron needs during pregnancy, but it is always best to consult with a healthcare professional before starting any supplementation.

In conclusion, maintaining a high iron diet during pregnancy is of utmost importance for the well-being of both the mother and the baby. By consuming a diet rich in iron and incorporating iron-rich foods into meals, pregnant women can ensure that they are meeting their nutritional needs and providing their developing baby with the necessary nutrients for healthy growth and development.

Iron: Essential for Pregnancy

Diet plays a crucial role in ensuring a healthy pregnancy, and one of the most important nutrients needed during this time is iron. Iron is an essential mineral that is responsible for carrying oxygen throughout the body. During pregnancy, the body requires a higher amount of iron to support the growth and development of the baby.

An iron-rich diet is crucial for both the mother and the baby. Iron-rich foods contain a high content of iron, which can help meet the increased demand during pregnancy. Some examples of iron-rich foods include lean red meat, poultry, seafood, beans, lentils, spinach, and fortified cereals.

Iron is particularly important during pregnancy as it helps in the formation of red blood cells and supports the development of the baby’s brain and nervous system. It also helps prevent iron-deficiency anemia, a condition that can lead to fatigue, weakness, and increased risk of infections.

Iron-Rich Foods Iron Content (per serving)
Lean Red Meat Up to 3.5 mg
Poultry 1.5-2.5 mg
Seafood (such as fish and shellfish) 0.5-1.5 mg
Beans and Lentils 2-4 mg
Spinach 3.5-4 mg
Fortified Cereals 3-18 mg

It’s important to note that the body absorbs iron from animal sources more easily than from plant sources. To enhance the absorption of iron from plant-based foods, it’s recommended to consume them with a source of vitamin C, such as citrus fruits or tomatoes.

During pregnancy, it’s essential to ensure a high iron diet to meet the increased demand and support the health and development of both the mother and the baby. Consult with a healthcare provider for personalized recommendations and to monitor iron levels throughout pregnancy.

Benefits of Iron During Pregnancy

An iron-rich diet is crucial during pregnancy, as it ensures that the body has enough iron to produce sufficient red blood cells for both the mother and the developing fetus. Iron is an essential mineral that plays a vital role in the production of hemoglobin, the protein in red blood cells that carries oxygen throughout the body.

During pregnancy, the blood volume increases to accommodate the needs of the growing fetus. This increase in blood volume requires a higher iron content, as iron is necessary to produce additional red blood cells. Iron deficiency during pregnancy, also known as anemia, can lead to various complications such as preterm birth, low birth weight, and developmental delays in the baby.

Consuming an iron-rich diet during pregnancy can help prevent these complications and support the healthy development of the baby. Foods that are rich in iron include lean meats, poultry, fish, legumes, leafy green vegetables, and fortified cereals.

In addition to supporting the production of red blood cells, iron is also important for the overall development of the baby. It plays a crucial role in the development of the baby’s brain and nervous system. Iron is involved in the production of myelin, a substance that insulates nerve fibers and ensures their proper functioning.

Iron is also essential for the baby’s immune system. It helps in the formation of white blood cells, which are responsible for fighting off infections and diseases. Adequate iron during pregnancy can help boost the baby’s immune system, providing protection against common illnesses.

In conclusion, maintaining a diet rich in iron during pregnancy is vital for the well-being and proper development of both the mother and the baby. It supports the production of red blood cells, ensures the healthy development of the baby’s brain and immune system, and helps prevent complications such as anemia. Including iron-rich foods in the diet during pregnancy is an important measure to promote a healthy pregnancy and ensure a positive outcome for both mother and baby.

Iron Deficiency and Pregnancy Complications

Iron plays a crucial role in the development of a healthy pregnancy. Without enough iron, pregnant women may experience iron deficiency, which can lead to a number of complications.

Iron is needed to produce hemoglobin, a protein that carries oxygen to the body’s tissues. During pregnancy, the body requires more iron to support the growing baby and the increased blood volume. Without sufficient iron intake, the body cannot produce enough hemoglobin, leading to iron-deficiency anemia.

Iron-deficiency anemia during pregnancy can have serious consequences for both the mother and the baby. For the mother, iron deficiency can lead to fatigue, weakness, and an increased risk of infection. It can also result in complications during childbirth, such as preterm birth or low birth weight.

For the baby, iron deficiency can hinder proper growth and development. It can increase the risk of preterm birth, low birth weight, and developmental delays. Iron deficiency can also affect the baby’s cognitive function later in life.

To prevent iron deficiency during pregnancy, it is important to follow a high iron-rich diet. Pregnant women should consume foods that are rich in iron, such as lean meats, poultry, fish, legumes, and leafy green vegetables. It is also beneficial to pair foods high in iron with foods that are rich in vitamin C, as vitamin C helps the body absorb iron more efficiently.

In addition to a diet rich in iron, pregnant women may also be advised to take iron supplements prescribed by their healthcare provider. These supplements can help ensure that the body is getting enough iron to support both the mother and the baby.

In conclusion, iron deficiency during pregnancy can have significant consequences for both the mother and the baby. Therefore, it is crucial for pregnant women to maintain a high iron-rich diet and follow the recommendations of their healthcare provider to prevent iron deficiency and its associated complications.

How to Increase Iron Intake During Pregnancy

During pregnancy, it is crucial to maintain a high iron intake in order to support both the mother and the growing baby. Iron-rich foods can help prevent iron deficiency anemia, which can have detrimental effects on both the mother and the baby’s health.

Incorporate Iron-Rich Foods

One of the most effective ways to increase iron intake during pregnancy is to incorporate iron-rich foods into your diet. Foods such as lean meats, poultry, fish, beans, lentils, tofu, spinach, kale, broccoli, and fortified grains are excellent sources of iron. Including these foods in your meals can help ensure that you are getting enough iron to support a healthy pregnancy.

Pair Iron-Rich Foods with Vitamin C

In order to enhance iron absorption, it is recommended to pair iron-rich foods with foods high in vitamin C. Vitamin C helps the body absorb and utilize the iron from plant-based sources. Incorporating citrus fruits, strawberries, tomatoes, bell peppers, and leafy greens into your meals can help optimize iron absorption.

It is important to note that consuming too much iron can also have negative effects. Therefore, it is advisable to consult with a healthcare professional to determine the appropriate iron intake for your individual needs during pregnancy.

Iron-Rich Foods Serving Size Iron Content (mg)
Lean meat (beef, pork, lamb) 3 ounces 1-3 mg
Poultry (chicken, turkey) 3 ounces 1-2 mg
Fish (salmon, tuna) 3 ounces 0.5-1.5 mg
Beans (kidney beans, chickpeas) 1/2 cup 2-3 mg
Lentils 1/2 cup 3.3 mg
Tofu 1/2 cup 3 mg
Spinach 1/2 cup cooked 2.5 mg
Kale 1/2 cup cooked 1 mg
Broccoli 1/2 cup cooked 0.5 mg
Fortified grains 1 cup varies

By incorporating iron-rich foods into your diet and pairing them with vitamin C-rich foods, you can ensure that you are providing your body with the necessary nutrients to support a healthy pregnancy. Remember to consult with a healthcare professional for personalized nutritional advice.

Best Sources of Iron for Pregnant Women

Diet plays a crucial role in ensuring a healthy pregnancy, and one essential nutrient that should be prioritized is iron. Iron is especially important during pregnancy as it helps in the production of hemoglobin, the protein in red blood cells that carries oxygen to the body’s tissues. Pregnant women need more iron to support the increased blood volume and to provide enough iron for proper fetal development.

Here are some iron-rich foods that pregnant women should include in their diet:

Lean Meats and Poultry

Lean meats such as beef, pork, and lamb, as well as poultry like chicken and turkey, are excellent sources of iron. These meats are not only high in iron content but also provide essential proteins that are necessary for the baby’s growth and development.

Seafood

Seafood, such as fish and shellfish, is another great source of iron. Salmon, tuna, oysters, and clams are particularly rich in iron. However, pregnant women should be cautious about consuming certain types of fish that may contain high levels of mercury and limit their intake as per the recommendations of their healthcare provider.

Leafy Green Vegetables

Vegetables like spinach, kale, and broccoli are packed with iron and other beneficial nutrients. These iron-rich greens are also high in folate, which is vital for the development of the baby’s neural tube and can help prevent certain birth defects.

It is important to note that the body absorbs iron better when consumed with foods rich in vitamin C, so including fruits like oranges, strawberries, and kiwi can enhance iron absorption. On the other hand, it is advisable to avoid consuming iron-rich foods with calcium-rich foods or beverages like milk, as calcium can hinder iron absorption.

During pregnancy, maintaining a high iron intake is crucial for both the mother and the baby. By incorporating these iron-rich foods into their diet, pregnant women can support their iron needs and ensure a healthy pregnancy.

Plant-based Iron-rich Foods for Pregnancy

Iron is an essential nutrient for a healthy pregnancy, as it helps transport oxygen to both you and your baby. While many people associate iron with meat, there are plenty of plant-based options that are rich in this vital mineral.

During pregnancy, it is important to include a variety of iron-rich foods in your diet to ensure you are getting enough of this nutrient. Here are some plant-based foods that are particularly rich in iron:

Food Iron Content (per serving)
Spinach 6.4 mg
Lentils 3.3 mg
Black beans 3.6 mg
Tofu 3.4 mg
Quinoa 2.8 mg
Chickpeas 2.4 mg

These plant-based foods not only provide a good amount of iron, but they also contain other important nutrients like fiber, protein, and vitamins. Incorporating them into your meals can help ensure a balanced and nutritious diet during pregnancy.

Remember to combine iron-rich foods with sources of vitamin C, as it helps with the absorption of iron. For example, pairing spinach with citrus fruits or adding some lemon juice to your lentil soup can enhance iron absorption.

It is always recommended to consult with a healthcare professional or registered dietitian for personalized advice and guidance on meeting your nutritional needs during pregnancy.

Animal-based Iron-rich Foods for Pregnancy

During pregnancy, it is important to consume a diet that is high in iron content to ensure proper development for both the mother and the baby. Iron is an essential mineral that plays a crucial role in the production of red blood cells, which are responsible for carrying oxygen throughout the body.

One way to increase iron intake during pregnancy is to include animal-based foods that are rich in iron. These foods not only provide a good source of iron, but they also contain other important nutrients that are vital for a healthy pregnancy.

Lean Red Meat

Lean red meat, such as beef and lamb, is a great source of iron during pregnancy. These meats are not only high in iron content, but they also provide important vitamins and minerals like vitamin B12 and zinc. It is important to choose lean cuts of meat to minimize saturated fat intake during pregnancy.

Poultry

Poultry, including chicken and turkey, is another excellent source of iron for pregnant women. These meats are leaner than red meat and offer a good amount of iron, as well as other nutrients like vitamin B6 and niacin. Grilling, baking, or broiling these meats is a healthier option compared to frying.

It is important to note that iron from animal sources is more easily absorbed by the body compared to iron from plant-based sources. However, it is still recommended to include a variety of iron-rich foods in the diet during pregnancy to ensure adequate intake.

Conclusion

Incorporating animal-based iron-rich foods like lean red meat and poultry into a pregnancy diet can help meet the increased iron needs during this crucial period. However, it is important to consult with a healthcare professional to personalize a diet plan that caters to individual needs and preferences.

Combining Iron-rich Foods for Better Absorption

Incorporating a high iron diet during pregnancy is crucial to ensure a healthy development for both mother and baby. However, it is equally important to understand that not all iron-rich foods are absorbed equally by the body. In order to optimize iron absorption, it is recommended to combine iron-rich foods with other nutrients that enhance its uptake.

Iron can be found in both animal and plant sources, with the highest concentration being present in organ meats, shellfish, and legumes. By including these foods in your diet, you can increase your iron intake significantly. However, it is important to note that the type of iron found in animal sources, heme iron, is more easily absorbed by the body compared to non-heme iron found in plant sources.

To enhance the absorption of non-heme iron, it is recommended to consume it alongside foods rich in vitamin C. Citrus fruits, tomatoes, bell peppers, and strawberries are excellent sources of vitamin C and can be paired with iron-rich foods to optimize absorption. For example, adding sliced oranges to a spinach salad or enjoying a glass of freshly squeezed orange juice with your lentil soup can significantly improve iron absorption.

In addition to vitamin C, it is also important to include foods rich in beta-carotene, such as carrots, sweet potatoes, and dark leafy greens, as they can enhance the uptake of non-heme iron. Including these foods in your meals can not only provide you with a variety of nutrients but also ensure that your body efficiently absorbs the iron content.

While combining iron-rich foods with enhancers like vitamin C and beta-carotene can improve iron absorption, it is important to note that certain substances can hinder iron uptake. For instance, consuming calcium-rich foods like dairy products, alongside iron-rich meals, can reduce iron absorption. Therefore, it is advisable to avoid combining these foods and opt for other calcium sources throughout the day.

In conclusion, incorporating a high iron diet during pregnancy is essential, but it is equally important to combine iron-rich foods with enhancers like vitamin C and beta-carotene to optimize their absorption. By including a variety of iron-rich foods and ensuring a balanced nutrient intake, you can provide your body with the necessary iron during this critical time.

Cooking Tips to Maximize Iron Content in Food

Cooking with iron-rich ingredients is essential for a high iron content diet during pregnancy. By incorporating these tips into your cooking routine, you can ensure that you are maximizing the iron content in your meals:

1. Choose Foods Rich in Iron

To increase the iron content in your meals, opt for foods that are naturally high in iron. Some excellent choices include lean red meat, spinach, lentils, and tofu. Incorporating these ingredients into your meals can significantly boost your iron intake.

2. Combine Iron-Rich Foods with Vitamin C

Vitamin C helps with iron absorption, so it is essential to combine iron-rich foods with sources of vitamin C. Include citrus fruits, bell peppers, and tomatoes in your meals to enhance iron absorption. For example, squeeze some lemon juice over your lentil soup or enjoy a spinach salad with a side of freshly sliced tomatoes.

3. Cook with Cast Iron Cookware

Cooking with cast iron cookware can increase the iron content in your food. The iron from the cookware can leach into the food during the cooking process, adding an additional iron boost to your meals. Make sure to season your cast iron cookware properly before use and follow the manufacturer’s instructions for care and maintenance.

4. Avoid Overcooking

Overcooking can lead to a loss of nutrients, including iron. To maximize the iron content in your food, avoid overcooking your meals. Cook vegetables until they are tender-crisp and meat until it is cooked to the desired doneness. This way, you can retain as much iron as possible in your dishes.

5. Soak and Sprout Legumes

Legumes, such as beans and lentils, are excellent sources of iron. However, they also contain phytates, which can inhibit iron absorption. To maximize the iron content in legumes, soak and sprout them before cooking. Soaking and sprouting can help reduce the phytate content, making the iron more bioavailable.

By following these cooking tips, you can ensure that your meals are packed with iron and support a healthy diet during pregnancy.

Foods to Avoid During Iron-rich Diet in Pregnancy

During pregnancy, it is important to consume a diet rich in iron to support the increased blood volume and the development of the baby. However, there are some foods that pregnant women should avoid to ensure optimal iron absorption and overall health.

Caffeinated beverages: While it may be tempting to reach for a cup of coffee or tea in the morning, it is recommended to limit consumption of caffeinated beverages during pregnancy. Caffeine can interfere with iron absorption, making it harder for the body to absorb the iron from the diet.

Processed and fast foods: Processed and fast foods are typically high in sodium and low in nutrients, including iron. These foods often contain additives and preservatives that can negatively affect iron absorption. It is best to opt for fresh, whole foods whenever possible.

High-calcium foods: Calcium is an essential nutrient during pregnancy, but consuming high-calcium foods simultaneously with iron-rich foods can hinder iron absorption. It is advisable to separate the consumption of these foods by a few hours to optimize iron absorption.

Foods high in tannins: Tannins are naturally occurring compounds found in certain foods, such as tea, red wine, and berries. They can inhibit iron absorption in the body. While these foods can still be enjoyed in moderation, it is best to avoid consuming them alongside iron-rich foods.

Uncooked or undercooked meats and fish: Raw or undercooked meats and fish pose a risk of bacterial and parasitic infections, which can be harmful to both the mother and the baby. It is important to cook these foods thoroughly to eliminate any potential risks.

Alcohol: Alcohol should be completely avoided during pregnancy, as it can lead to serious complications and birth defects. Consumption of alcohol can also interfere with iron absorption and deplete the body’s iron stores.

Conclusion: While consuming a high iron diet is important during pregnancy, it is equally important to be aware of certain foods that can hinder iron absorption. By avoiding caffeinated beverages, processed and fast foods, high-calcium foods, tannin-rich foods, uncooked or undercooked meats and fish, and alcohol, pregnant women can ensure optimal iron levels for the health and development of the baby.

Iron Supplements for Pregnant Women

During pregnancy, it is crucial for women to maintain a high iron content in their diet. Iron plays a vital role in the production of hemoglobin, which carries oxygen to the cells in both the mother and the fetus. A deficiency in iron can lead to anemia, which can have serious consequences for both the mother and the baby.

In some cases, it may be necessary for pregnant women to supplement their diet with iron. Iron supplements provide a concentrated source of iron, ensuring that the mother’s body has enough of this essential mineral to support a healthy pregnancy. It is important to consult with a healthcare professional before starting any iron supplementation regimen.

Choosing the Right Iron Supplement

When selecting an iron supplement, it is important to consider the dosage and form. Pregnant women typically require a higher dosage than non-pregnant individuals, so be sure to choose a supplement that meets the recommended daily intake for pregnancy.

Iron supplements come in various forms, including ferrous sulfate, ferrous gluconate, and ferrous fumarate. Each form has a different level of iron content, so it’s essential to choose one with a high iron content to ensure maximum absorption.

Possible Side Effects and Risks

While iron supplements can be beneficial during pregnancy, they may also cause some side effects. Common side effects include constipation, nausea, and stomach discomfort. In some cases, iron supplements may also interfere with the absorption of other nutrients, such as calcium and zinc.

It is important to follow the recommended dosage and speak with a healthcare professional if any symptoms or concerns arise. They can provide guidance on managing side effects and ensure that the iron supplement is being properly absorbed by the body.

In conclusion, iron supplements can be a valuable addition to a pregnant woman’s diet. They can help ensure that both the mother and the baby receive adequate amounts of iron during this crucial time of growth and development.

Managing Iron Levels with Regular Blood Tests

During pregnancy, it is important to maintain a diet rich in iron to prevent iron deficiency anemia. However, simply consuming an iron-rich diet may not guarantee optimal iron levels in the body. Regular blood tests are essential to monitor iron levels and ensure that they are within the recommended range.

An iron-rich diet may include foods such as lean red meat, poultry, fish, beans, fortified cereals, and leafy green vegetables. These foods contain a form of iron called heme iron, which is easily absorbed by the body. Additionally, consuming foods high in vitamin C, such as citrus fruits and tomatoes, can help enhance iron absorption.

In order to manage iron levels effectively, it is recommended to undergo regular blood tests throughout pregnancy. These tests measure various markers, such as hemoglobin and ferritin levels, which indicate the body’s iron status. If iron levels are found to be low, healthcare providers may suggest iron supplements or adjustments to the diet to ensure adequate iron intake.

Monitoring iron levels is crucial because iron deficiency anemia during pregnancy can lead to complications for both the mother and the baby. Iron is essential for the production of red blood cells, which carry oxygen throughout the body. Insufficient iron levels can result in fatigue, weakness, and an increased risk of preterm birth or low birth weight.

In conclusion, managing iron levels during pregnancy is vital for the health and well-being of both the mother and the baby. While consuming an iron-rich diet is important, regular blood tests are necessary to accurately assess iron levels and make any necessary adjustments to the content of the diet. By maintaining optimal iron levels, pregnant women can reduce the risk of iron deficiency anemia and ensure a healthy pregnancy.

Potential Side Effects of Iron Supplements in Pregnancy

While maintaining a high iron content in your diet during pregnancy is essential, some women may require additional iron supplements to meet their daily iron requirements. However, it’s important to be aware of the potential side effects that may occur when taking iron supplements during pregnancy.

Iron supplements can sometimes cause gastrointestinal distress such as constipation, nausea, or diarrhea. This is because high doses of iron can be difficult for the body to absorb and can irritate the digestive system. It is recommended to take iron supplements with food to minimize these side effects.

In rare cases, some women may experience allergic reactions to iron supplements. Symptoms of an allergic reaction may include hives, rash, itching, difficulty breathing, or swelling of the face, lips, tongue, or throat. If you experience any of these symptoms after taking an iron supplement, you should seek immediate medical attention.

Iron supplements may also interact with certain medications or other dietary supplements. It is important to discuss any other medications or supplements you are taking with your healthcare provider before starting an iron supplement. They can help determine the appropriate dosage and timing to avoid any potential interactions.

It’s important to note that iron-rich foods should always be the first choice for increasing iron intake during pregnancy. However, in cases where the iron content of the diet alone is insufficient, iron supplements can be an effective way to ensure adequate iron levels for both the mother and the developing baby. With proper guidance and monitoring from a healthcare provider, the potential side effects of iron supplements can be minimized, allowing pregnant women to benefit from the essential nutrient that iron provides.

Helpful Tips to Prevent Iron Deficiency in Pregnancy

Iron deficiency is a common problem during pregnancy and can lead to complications for both the mother and the baby. To ensure a healthy pregnancy, it is important to maintain an iron-rich diet with foods that are high in iron content.

  • Include foods such as lean meats, poultry, and fish in your diet. These animal-based products are rich in heme iron, which is highly absorbable by the body.
  • Incorporate plant-based sources of iron, such as beans, lentils, tofu, and spinach, into your meals. These foods are rich in non-heme iron, which may be harder for the body to absorb but can still contribute to your overall iron intake.
  • Pair iron-rich foods with foods that are rich in vitamin C, such as citrus fruits, strawberries, and bell peppers. Vitamin C enhances the absorption of non-heme iron, making it easier for the body to utilize.
  • Avoid consuming calcium-rich foods, such as dairy products, at the same time as iron-rich foods, as calcium can hinder iron absorption. Instead, separate these foods by a few hours to maximize iron absorption.
  • Consider taking iron supplements as recommended by your healthcare provider. Supplements can help ensure you are getting adequate iron during pregnancy, especially if your dietary intake is insufficient.
  • Be mindful of foods and beverages that can inhibit iron absorption, such as coffee, tea, and certain types of grains. Limiting your intake of these substances can help maximize iron absorption.
  • Consult with a registered dietitian or nutritionist who specializes in prenatal nutrition to create a personalized meal plan that meets your specific iron needs during pregnancy.

By following these helpful tips and maintaining an iron-rich diet, you can prevent iron deficiency during pregnancy and promote a healthy pregnancy for both you and your baby.

Consulting a Healthcare Provider for Iron-rich Diet Plan

If you are pregnant and want to ensure a healthy pregnancy, it is important to consult with a healthcare provider about an iron-rich diet plan. Iron is a key nutrient during pregnancy, and it is necessary for the proper development of the baby.

When consulting a healthcare provider, they will assess your current iron levels and provide you with a diet plan that is rich in iron. This will include foods that are naturally high in iron, such as lean meats, poultry, fish, beans, and leafy green vegetables.

In addition to providing you with a diet plan, your healthcare provider may also recommend iron supplements to ensure that you are getting enough iron during pregnancy. It is important to take these supplements as directed, as taking too much iron can have negative side effects.

It is important to note that iron absorption can be enhanced when consumed with foods that are high in vitamin C. Therefore, your healthcare provider may also recommend including vitamin C-rich foods, such as citrus fruits and berries, in your diet plan.

Remember, consulting a healthcare provider is the best way to ensure that you are getting the right amount of iron for a healthy pregnancy. They will be able to tailor a diet plan specifically for you, taking into consideration any other health conditions or dietary restrictions you may have.

In summary, consulting a healthcare provider for an iron-rich diet plan during pregnancy is essential for ensuring a healthy pregnancy. Don’t hesitate to seek professional advice to make sure you and your baby are getting the right amount of iron.